Jan 29, 2022  
2017-2018 Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting: General

  
  •  

    ACG 2021 - Principles of Financial Accounting


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisites: MAT 0018  and REA 0017 , or equivalent.

    This is a three hour lecture course that provides a corporate view of accounting principles from a user and preparer’s perspective.  It is designed to introduce students to the major concepts in financial accounting, namely the accounting equation, the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation, and procedures and principles of accounting for assets and liabilities.


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    ACG 2071 - Principles of Managerial Accounting


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ACG 2021 .

    Emphasis is on managerial accounting concepts and systems, planning and control, decentralized operations, analysis for decision-making, financial analysis for management and modern uses of managerial accounting in nonprofit organizations.


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  •  

    ACG 2100 - Intermediate Accounting I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites: ACG 2071 .

    This course reviews the accounting model, statement preparation, concepts, standards, and principles underlying the measurement and reporting of financial position.  Further topics include accounting income, cash, receivables, inventories, plant and equipment, and intangible assets.


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  •  

    ACG 2110 - Intermediate Accounting II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites: ACG 2100  

    This course is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I and includes a detailed study of current and long-term liabilities, investments, shareholders’ equity, retained earnings and earnings per share, pensions, leases, tax allocation, errors and corrections, and the statement of cash flows.


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    ACG 2360 - Cost Accounting


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites: ACG 2071 .

    The accumulation of cost data with detailed coverage of materials, labor and factory overhead, job order and process costing, budgeting and standard costs.


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    ACG 2930 - Special Topics in Accounting


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course is designed to meet the special needs of individuals or groups for whom regularly described courses in accounting may not be available. (Offered as needed)


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    ACG 2949 - Internship in Accounting


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Four, eight or 12 hours of volunteer or work experience per week are expected depending on the credit hour requirements. Prerequisites:   and permission of program manager.

    This work-study course reinforces educational and professional growth in accounting through coordinated field experiences or through a virtual internship course focused on auditing. It is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply classroom theory to practical, work-related applications. The student, instructor and work site supervisor work together to determine specific learning objectives for each student. The student is then evaluated based on documentation of satisfactory completion of the learning objectives and work assignments. With program manager’s approval and based upon degree requirements, degree-seeking students who are making progress in their degree program may repeat this course for a maximum total of three credits. (Offered only as needed.)


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American History

  
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    AMH 1010 - U.S. History to 1877


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course meets Area III of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements. This one-term survey course of United States history covers the European discoveries of the Western Hemisphere to the end of Reconstruction. Emphasis is on historical study to determine the social, economic and political issues through Reconstruction.


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    AMH 1020 - U.S. History 1877 to Present


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course meets Area III of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements. This one-term course of United States history covers the end of Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis on historical study to determine the social, economic, and political problems of the 20th and 21st centuries.


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    AMH 1091 - African-American History and Culture


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course meets part of the International/Intercultural requirement. This course introduces the student to the history and culture of African-Americans. The aim of the course is threefold: 1) to analyze the discourse that surrounds African-American history and culture; 2) to observe major trends in African-American history and culture; and 3) to examine the critical nexus of race/class and its implications for future generations.


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    AMH 2930 - Special Topics in American History


    (1 to 4 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

    This course is designed to meet the specific needs of individuals or groups for whom regularly described courses may not be available.


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American Literature

  
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    AML 2010 - American Literature I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ENC 1101  and concurrent registration in or completion of ENC 1102  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area IV of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements, the Gordon Rule requirement and part of the International/Intercultural requirement. The term begins with a study of the literature of Native Americans and European explorers and continues with literature of colonization, federalization, Transcendentalism and the development of major American literature to 1865. Emphasis is on the richness of cultural, racial and gender diversity that constitutes the American experience.


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    AML 2020 - American Literature II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ENC 1101  and concurrent registration in or completion of ENC 1102  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area IV of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements, the Gordon Rule requirement and part of the International/ Intercultural requirement. This course begins in 1865 and explores literary Realism, Naturalism, Modernism and Post-Modernism. Emphasis is on the richness of cultural, racial and gender diversity that constitutes the American experience.


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    AML 2266 - Florida Writers


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites:   and   with a grade of “C” or better, or concurrent registration in  .

    This course meets the Gordon Rule requirement, and part of the International/Intercultural requirement. The course provides a study of Florida literature from the Native American cultures through that of early European settlers and explorers, as well as a survey of major works about or set in Florida from the modern period into the 21st century.


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    AML 2600 - African-American Literature


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ENC 1101  and concurrent registration in or completion of ENC 1102  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area IV of the A.A./A.A.S./A.S. general education requirements, the Gordon Rule requirement and part of the International/Intercultural requirement. Historical and critical analyses of African-American literature; its roots in an Afro-centric cultural and literary experience that affects major genres and historical movements: slave narrative, poetry, folklore, drama, political essay; the Harlem Renaissance; and the development of the novel and contemporary writers are covered.


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Anthropology

  
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    ANT 2000 - Introduction to Anthropology


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ENC 1101  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area III requirements for the A.A. /A.S. general education requirements and the Gordon Rule requirement.  This course is an introduction to the study of humanity and its culture.  It is accomplished by studying physical and cultural anthropology, archaeology and linguistics. This course meets part of the six-hour International/Intercultural requirements.


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    ANT 2100 - Introduction To Archaeology


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course meets highlights the basic concepts and fundamental principles of method and theory in modern archaeology. The history of archaeology is traced from its origins to its emergence as a scientific discipline within anthropology. Students are familiarized with the concepts and methods of modern archaeology, and with the scientific goals of archaeological research. A survey of the latest advances in the field such as remote sensing and non-intrusive techniques is included. As a writing intensive course, ANT 2100 allows students to explore the subject through a variety of college-level writing exercises that may include essay exams, book reviews, research papers, reaction papers, research proposals, research designs and excavation logs.


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    ANT 2410 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course introduces the student to the study of human culture on a global scale including Native American, European, African, Asian, and oceanic societies. Topics to be explored include technologies, political-economic organization, kinship systems, religion, art, and cultural change.  This course meets part of the six-hour International/Intercultural requirements.


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    ANT 2511 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Corequisites: ANT 2511L   This course will trace the origins of humanity from non-human primates throughout extinct hominins to modern humans. Topics of emphasis include the basics of human evolutionary theory, genetics and paleoanthropology, primate taxonomy, human evolutionary history through the fossil record, modern human origins theories and global migration, and human diversity and variation. The course includes a lab companion in which students will be conducting laboratories relevant to topics covered in the classroom.


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    ANT 2511L - Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lab


    (1 Credit Hour)
    (A.A.)


    Corequisites: ANT 2511 . This is a lab companion to an overview of biological anthropology. The student will be doing laboratories which are relevant to the class topics covered in the lecture and material in ANT 2511.


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    ANT 2930 - Special Topics in Anthropology


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ANT 2000  and permission of the instructor.

    This course is designed to meet the specific needs of individuals or groups for whom regularly described courses may not be available. It may involve study, research or field projects in areas such as physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistics or cultural anthropology.


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Applied Accounting

  
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    APA 1111 - Introduction to Accounting


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Three hours per week.

    Introduction and practice in fundamentals of financial record keeping and reporting.  This course is appropriate for accounting, business, and also nonbusiness majors whose program only requires three hours of accounting. A study of the accounting equation, commonly used accounting statements including income measurement, financial condition, cash flow and retained earnings and how they meet the needs of stakeholders including owners, creditors, government agencies, providers of capital, managers and employees among others. This course is neither a prerequisite nor substitute for ACG 2021 .


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    APA 2141 - Computers for Accounting Applications


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites: ACG 2021  and CGS 1570 .

    This course provides a realistic approach to computerized, integrated accounting principles. Accounting systems commonly found in business environments are examined. Standards, capability, limitations and flexibility of computerized accounting systems are discussed and implemented. Additional special fees are required. (Spring)


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Art History

  
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    ARH 2000 - Art Appreciation


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course meets Area IV of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements and part of the International/Intercultural requirement. This course is a multimedia/lecture approach to the understanding and appreciation of art. The course introduces the student to the formal elements of art, the different art mediums and how art is made, as well as placing art in an historical context. Emphasis is placed on the changing role of art and artists throughout history as well as the political, cultural and scientific values that have molded the art world.


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    ARH 2050 - Introduction to History of Art I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ENC 1101  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area IV of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements, the Gordon Rule requirement and part of the International/Intercultural requirement. The course is a survey of the art of the world from prehistoric times through the medieval period in the West and a study and comparison of Western art with that of the Orient, the Pre-Columbian Americas and Tribal Africa.


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    ARH 2051 - Introduction to History of Art II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: ENC 1101  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area IV of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements, the Gordon Rule requirement and part of the International/Intercultural requirement. The course is a survey of the art of the world from the Renaissance to contemporary times. Developments in architecture, painting, sculpture and minor arts of the world from the 15th through the 20th century will be discussed.


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    ARH 2930 - Special Topics: Art History


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course is designed to meet the specific needs of individuals and groups for whom regular, described courses may not be available.


    Click here for course scheduling information.



Art

  
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    ART 1150C - Jewelry


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    Jewelry I is an introductory course focusing on the design and fabrication of jewelry and metal forms. Techniques include, soldering, casting, forming, stone setting and polishing.


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    ART 1201C - Two-Dimensional Design


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    This introductory studio course presents the fundamental principles of visual organization in the arts. The plastic elements are explored through direct experience with materials to achieve a sensitive response in problem solving. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    ART 1203C - Three-Dimensional Design


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    This course is designed to develop a working understanding and appreciation of the interaction of form in space. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 1205C - Color Fundamentals


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    This course will explore the effective use of color theory in the visual arts. Students will learn additive and subtractive techniques using various media and digital software. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 1300C - Drawing I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    Drawing I is an introduction to the basic processes, concepts and conventional drawing materials. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 1301C - Drawing II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week. Prerequisites: ART 1300C .

    Drawing II continues the introduction of drawing through studio practice in composition, basic techniques and applications to figure and various media such as painting and printmaking. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2251C - Illustration


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week. Prerequisites: ART 1300C  

    This is the introductory course for students intent on pursuing a career in commercial art. The course will cover illustration techniques used in the editorial, advertising, sequential and commercial fields of art. Assignments focus on black-and-white and/or color techniques using contrast, values, composition and function.


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    ART 2254C - Illustration II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Three hours studio/letcture per week. Prerequisites: ART 2251C  

    This is the intermediate study of illustration for students intending to pursue a career as an illustrator. The course will cover intermediate to advanced rendering in a variety of media and linear techniques as used in the industry of commercial illustration. Attention will be given to composition, perspective drawing, formalizing concepts and interpreting client needs to successfully complete assignments.


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    ART 2330C - Figure Drawing I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week. Prerequisites: ART 1300C  or permission of department.

    Students are prepared for application in the basic phases of drawing the figure. Through observing the visual study of the movement, structure and rhythm of the figure, students will grasp the basics in rendering the human form onto a two-dimensional field. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2331C - Figure Drawing II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week. Prerequisites: ART 2330C  or permission of department.

    Intermediate techniques of figure drawing. The emphasis of this course is in the continuation of application. Students are prepared for the application into the intermediate phases of drawing the figure. Through observing the visual study of the movement, structure and rhythm of the figure, students will grasp an elevated understanding of the human form. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2500C - Painting I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    This course is an introduction to the basic conceptual techniques of painting. The main emphasis of this course involves color mixing, composition, form and perspective techniques including the basics in media preparation. Furthermore, the exploration of shape and space through the training of observation is approached. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2501C - Painting II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week. Prerequisites: ART 2500C  or approval of department.

    Intermediate techniques of painting. The emphasis of this course is in the continuation of application. Moreover, the aesthetic quality of the presentation is investigated. Intermediate students receive instruction in the application of alternative painting techniques, unique perspective control, compositional form and emerged thought. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2502C - Figure Painting


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week Prerequisites: ART 2500C  

    Approaches to rendering the human form in paint are explored and developed through color studies and studio paintings from a live model. Students build on basic painting skills and learn how to use color to portray the human form in space. Painting and brushwork techniques such as layering, glazing and impasto are developed. Solvent-free oil painting process is used.


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    ART 2623C - Introduction to 3D Modeling


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week. Prerequisites: DIG 2111C  

    This course introduces the computer as a viable tool in the design and implementation of character concepts, sculpture and product design. It incorporates the concepts of orthographic drawing, primitives, shapes into wireframes, lofting and surface revolution, surface mapping and three-point lighting. Students will utilize Mac computers and 3-D rendering software to create 3-D models of products, sculptures and characters based on their photographs and drawings.


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    ART 2701C - Sculpture


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    Concentration is on aesthetic principles, techniques and materials used in the medium. Materials used are stone and clay with an emphasis on plaster waste-mold construction. Alternative materials that may be used include wood and polyester resin. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2702C - Sculpture II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week with the expectation that students will put in additional hours for time-consuming projects. Prerequisites: ART 2701C .

    This course offers more advanced sculptural concepts and techniques in multiple forms and installation format. Materials used are clay, stone and alternative materials such as found object constructions. More emphasis is on mold making. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2715C - Welding: Steel Fabrication


    (3 credit hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites:   or   .

    This course is an advanced intensive investigation of the possibilities and construction methods of working in sheet, rods and angle iron steel stock. Assignments focus on strength, flexibility, connections and precision of the student’s design and fabrication. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2750C - Introduction to Ceramics


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    This course gives a basic knowledge of ceramic hand-building techniques with the exception of wheel work. The clays used are predominantly raku and high-fire stoneware. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2751C - Ceramics II


    (3 credit hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites:  .

    Ceramics II serves as an investigation at the intermediate level in hand-building processes in clay. This course emphasizes both advanced technical processes as well as aesthetic and conceptual exploration. Investigation of glazes and alternative surfaces are explored in greater detail. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2752C - Wheelthrowing I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week plus minimum of three additional hours involving a concentrated approach to the wheel and/or continued hand building.

    The students are responsible for making their own clay and learn to fire electric and gas kilns. Glaze chemistry is introduced and experimentation with recipes is encouraged. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2753C - Wheelthrowing II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week plus a minimum of three additional hours involving advanced throwing techniques. Prerequisites: ART 2752C .

    The students are responsible for making their own clay and assisting with the loading of gas and electric fired kilns. Students continue to work with glaze chemistry as they explore the use of limit formulas in developing new glazes from scratch. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2771C - Advanced Ceramics


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week. Prerequisites:   or  .

    More emphasis is placed on the aesthetics of clay work rather than traditional forming techniques. Students are encouraged to follow their own line of interests and where possible, fire their own work. Additional special fees are required.


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    ART 2773C - Mold Making


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours studio/lecture per week.

    An interdisciplinary investigation into using multiples and mold making that takes the skills of critical thinking, design and form and applies it to fabrication and production. Students will produce 3-D objects from various mold-making techniques made from their original designs.


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    ART 2930 - Special Topics: Art


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course is designed to meet the special needs of individuals and groups for whom regular, described courses may not be available.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    ART 2950 - Portfolio Preparation


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites:   or   or   or   or   or   or  .

    This course includes exploration of the standard business practices of art. It includes development of a working portfolio, biography, artist statement, goals and a business plan. Students learn the essential skills relevant to begin their careers in the arts.


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American Sign Language: Interpreting

  
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    ASL 1140 - American Sign Language I


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    4 hours per week includes one additional hour of laboratory work

    Corequisites: ASL 1140L  This course is an introduction to the basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax of American Sign Language. The history, values and culture of the deaf are explored.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    ASL 1140L - American Sign Language I Laboratory


    (1 Credit Hour)
    (A.A.)


    Required companion lab and co-requisite for ASL 1140 .


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    ASL 1150 - American Sign Language II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Four hours per week includes one additional hour of laboratory work. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ASL 1140  ASL 1140L  

    Corequisites: ASL 1150L   This course expands knowledge and vocabulary introduced in American Sign Language I by emphasizing increasingly complex grammatical structure and conversational skills.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    ASL 1150L - American Sign Language II Laboratory


    (1 Credit Hour)
    (A.A.)


    Prerequisites: Successful completion of ASL 1140  and ASL 1140L  with a grade of “C” or better.

    Corequisites: ASL 1150   Required companion lab and co-requisite for ASL 1150.


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    ASL 2160 - American Sign Language III


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours per week. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ASL 1150  ASL 1150L  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course develops students’ skills to recognize and produce different varieties of ASL discourse and will focus on how to start and finish a narrative, how to describe and include details, how to shift focus or change topics, and how to incorporate persuasive techniques and more sophisticated ways to share feelings and personal experiences.


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    ASL 2200 - American Sign Language IV


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours per week. Prerequisites: Successful completion of   with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course is an integration of expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language with an emphasis on culturally appropriate discourse styles and contextualization.  Students will be given instruction regarding idiomatic and colloquial usages of signs.  Additional complex grammatical topics such as classifiers, role-shifting, use of space and contrastive structure will be included.


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Astronomy

  
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    AST 1002 - Descriptive Astronomy


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    The course meets Area V requirements for the A.A./A.S. general education requirements.  This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the basic principles of astronomy. Topics covered include the history of astronomy, timekeeping, instrumentation, basic celestial mechanics and dynamics, comparative planetology and stellar evolution. This course uses a descriptive approach with a minimum of mathematics. Some fieldwork may be required.


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Biochemistry

  
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    BCH 3023 - Introduction to Biochemistry


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (B.S.)


    Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:   and   with a grade of “C” or better.

    This biochemistry course includes the investigation of the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The principles of enzymology, metabolism and bioenergetics are explored. This is an inquiry-based course that accentuates active learning techniques.


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Building Construction

  
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    BCN 1227 - Building Envelope Science


    (3 credit hours)
    (A.S.)


    The course covers the building envelope in terms of the functions it performs, atmospheric conditions it mediates between, its relationship to other building-perimeter systems, and the principles of physics and properties of materials employed to perform its functions.


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    BCN 1251C - Construction Drafting


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course is an introduction in the use of tools/techniques used in preparing a set of residential working drawings. A complete set of plans is required (in order to obtain a permit) and the set of plans must be saleable (having good design features). Emphasis is on developing accuracy, line quality, construction vocabulary and understanding the design process.


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    BCN 1512C - Energy Efficient HVAC Engineering


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course is an introduction to heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems installed in residential home building. The systems are studied for code requirements, system design, HVAC safety and working principles. Offered as BCN 1057 prior to Fall 2012.


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    BCN 1554 - Off the Grid


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course reviews the various programs and organizations that emphasize low, very low and net-zero building impact. Sustainable concepts such as stormwater retention systems, solar systems, photovoltaics, biofuels, roof top gardens, reforestation and xeriscaping are discussed, while continuing to address building aesthetics and beauty. Programs and organizations related to sustainability such as LEED, COTE, USGBC and the Living Building Challenge are highlighted. This class includes lecture and guest speakers.


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    BCN 1592 - Energy Efficient Building Construction


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This is an introductory course to designing and building energy efficient structures for Florida’s sub-tropical and tropical climates. This course investigates strategies, elements and devices that have been used successfully, in both historic and contemporary contexts, to enhance human comfort with less impact on the environment.


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    BCN 1597 - Introduction to Solar Energy


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course is an introduction to the characteristics of solar energy and the passive and active uses of solar energy in heating and cooling situations in typical residential construction. The course explores the characteristics of solar energy, its adaptation by the earth’s atmosphere, and current and future methods available to harness, control, and best utilize this source of energy. The course emphasizes the potential advantages available in the sustainability of this natural resource.


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    BCN 2046 - Introduction to Sustainability


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course examines issues essential to scholarship in the history, theory and practice of sustainability. Prominent issues include carbon footprint, economics, energy auditing, building certification, alternative energy, workforce credentials and transportation.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BCN 2230 - Building Construction Materials and Methods


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course is designed to teach the principles and practices of light construction. Building layout, form work for concrete, concrete placing, block and frame, stair building, roof framing, and exterior and interior finishes are some of the topics to be covered.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BCN 2930 - Special Topics: Building Construction


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course is designed to meet the special needs of individuals or groups for whom regularly described courses may not be available.


    Click here for course scheduling information.



Building Construction Trades

  
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    BCT 2760 - Building Codes and Specifications


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course covers current SBCCI Standard Building Code and the SBCCI Standard for Hurricane Resistant Residential Construction. In addition, the writing and reading of specifications, bidding procedures and the relationships between contractor, engineer, architect, owner, subcontractor and supplier are covered. The student also studies questions similar to those found on the Florida State Certification Exam.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BCT 2770 - Building Construction Estimating


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This is a study of estimating for the construction industries. Accurate estimates and computations are made of materials, labor, equipment, overhead costs and profits. The steps of estimating are covered from preliminary investigation through approximation to final estimate.


    Click here for course scheduling information.



Biological Sciences

  
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    BSC 1005C - Diversity of Life


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Four hours lecture/lab per week.

    The course meets Area V requirements for the A.A./A.S. general education requirements. This course is designed to introduce students to the diversity of life on Earth and integrate current issues to teach biological concepts. Topics covered include cells, organisms, genetics, evolution, ecology and behavior. This course investigates the traits and ecological roles of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. Many topics are taught through contemporary issues such as endangered species and threatened habitats. This course is appropriate for nonscience majors. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 1007C - Introduction to Biology


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.

    The course meets Area V requirements for the A.A./A.S. general education requirements. It is designed to give the student an understanding of the unifying principals governing life. The course is appropriate for nonscience majors and it is a recommended prerequisite for BSC 2010C , BSC 2085C  and MCB 2010C . Course topics include chemistry of living organisms, cell structure and function, energy and its transformations, cell division process, genetics and review of current biology research.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 1007L - Introduction to Biology Laboratory


    (0 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Companion laboratory to BSC 1007C . Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 1020 - Human Body


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours lecture per week

    This course meets part of the General Education requirements for Area V. In this class, the student will be introduced to the basic anatomical components and physiological functions of the eleven organ systems of the human body: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphoid, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive.  Additionally, the student will achieve a detailed understanding of at least 6 of the organ systems. The selection of organ systems for detailed instruction will be made at the discretion of the course instructor. Note(s): Students who have successfully completed BSC 2085C or BSC 2086C cannot subsequently earn credit for BSC 1020. (Formerly: BSC 1008).


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 1421 - Introduction to Biotechnology


    (1 Credit Hour)
    (A.S.)


    This is a seminar series survey course that provides an introduction to the foundations of biotechnology, including current DNA and RNA technologies, as well as its historical background, the cell and genetic disorders. The course includes an emphasis on current applications in medicine, agriculture, forensics and the environment. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 1949 - Co-op Work Experience I


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    A total of 160 hours of work experience is required. Prerequisites: Completion of at least one natural science course and permission of the instructor or program manager.

    This work-study course is designed to continue training in a student’s academic major through field experiences and is intended to be a last-term elective. The student, instructor and work-site supervisor work together to determine specific learning objectives for each student. The student is then evaluated based on documentation of satisfactory completion of the learning objectives and technical project. Cooperative education courses document supervised work experience within the student’s major. These hours are not transferable as upper-level internships, practicums or clinical practice. The credit will count toward electives in some A.A. degrees. Contact the departments or universities for specific credit information. With program manager’s approval and based upon degree requirements, degree-seeking students who are making progress in their degree program may repeat this course for a maximum total of three credits.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2010C - Fundamentals of Biology I


    (5 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHM 1025C  with a grade of “C” or better or one year of high school preparatory chemistry.

    This course meets Area V requirements for the A.A./A.S. general education requirements. This course is the first portion of a comprehensive study of the fundamentals of biology, including molecular biology, cellular biology, genetics, cell respiration and cell replication. This course is intended for the science and science-related majors. It is strongly recommended that students without recent coursework in biology take BSC 1007C .


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2010L - Fundamentals of Biology I Laboratory


    (0 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Companion laboratory to BSC 2010C . Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2011C - Fundamentals of Biology II


    (5 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BSC 2010C  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area V of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements. This course is the second portion of a comprehensive study of the fundamentals of biology including evolution, population genetics, phylogenetic systematics, form and function of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and animals, and ecology. This course is intended for science and science-related majors.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2011L - Fundamentals of Biology II Laboratory


    (0 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Companion laboratory to BSC 2011C . Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2031 - Topics in Biology - Bioethics


    (1 Credit Hour)
    (A.S.)


    One hour of discussion per week based on reading assignments. Prerequisites: Completion of   and BSC 2010C  with a grade of “C” or higher.

    This is a one-credit course that meets the requirement for the A.S. degree in Biotechnology. This course is a series of discussions based on pertinent topics in the biological research with societal impact. The course covers a broad range of ethical issues that relate to the fields of biology and medicine.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2085C - Anatomy and Physiology I


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  83 or higher on the ACCUPLACER test OR 106 or higher on the PERT (Postsecondary Education Readiness Test in reading). Students who graduated with a Florida standard diploma after 2009 are exempt from the aforementioned prerequisites.

    This course meets Area V requirements for the A.A./A.S. general education requirements.  This course begins with a review of basic chemistry and cell biology, then proceeds with the anatomy and physiology of human tissues and the following organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous.  It is strongly recommended that students without recent course work in biology take BSC 1007 or BSC 1020 BEFORE taking BSC 2085C.     


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2085L - Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory


    (0 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Companion laboratory to BSC 2085C . Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2086C - Anatomy and Physiology II


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BSC 2085C  with a grade of “C” or better.

    This course meets Area V requirements of the A.A./A.S. general education requirements.  This course is a continuation of Anatomy & Physiology I (BSC 2085C/L).  This course deals with the anatomy and physiology of humans for the following systems: cardiovascular, lymphoid and immune, endocrine, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2086L - Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory


    (0 Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Companion laboratory to BSC 2086C . Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2419C - Plant and Animal Cell Culture


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites: successful completion of  , or  , or BSC 2426C  

    This course covers the theories and techniques used in isolating and cultivating animal and plant cells in vitro. It includes applications of cell culture to solving problems relating to age, cancer, toxicology and genetic engineering. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2420C - Introduction to Biotechnology Methods


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Four hours lecture/laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Successful completion of BSC 2010C .

    This course includes basic concepts and techniques necessary to work effectively in a biotechnology laboratory. Basic skills learned include: following procedures and keeping records; laboratory safety procedures for biological, chemical and radiological hazards; introduction to quality systems; laboratory mathematics and measuring; preparing solutions; and basic techniques used for the separation of biomolecules. Emphasis is on DNA manipulation techniques. Students develop confidence in their ability to work safely and gain proficiency in the use of basic biotech lab instruments. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2426C - Biotechnology Methods I


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites: Successful completion of BSC 2010C  

    This course includes basic concepts and techniques necessary to work effectively in a biotechnology laboratory. Emphasis will be on methods of protein analysis within the context of biotechnology applications. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2427C - Biotechnology Methods II


    (4 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Four hours lecture/laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Successful completion of BSC 2420C  or BSC 2426C  

    This course introduces students to modern concepts of molecular biology with a laboratory focus on basic methods for preparing and analyzing nucleic acids. Emphasis is on techniques requires for RNA purification and manipulation. Other recent advances in nucleic acid manipulation will also be covered. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2435 - Introduction to Bioinformatics


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites:   

    This course presents students with the fundamental knowledge and skills of bioinformatics. Specific topics to be covered include: data file formats, accessing public databases for retrieval and submission, analysis using common tools, methods for high throughput data collection, storing and accessing biological data, and algorithms used to analyze data. Additional special fees are required.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2930 - Special Topics in Bioscience


    (1 to 4 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    This course is designed to meet the special needs of individuals or groups for whom regularly described courses in biological science may not be available.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2943C - Biotechnology Internship


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    A total of 160 hours of work experience is required. Prerequisites: Completion of   or   and permission of the instructor or program manager.

    This work-study course is designed to continue training in a student’s academic major through field experiences and is intended to be a last-term elective. The student, instructor, and work site supervisor work together to determine specific learning objectives for each student. The student is evaluated based on documentation for satisfactory completion of the learning objectives and technical project.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BSC 2949 - Internship in Biological Science


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.A.)


    Four, eight or 12 hours of volunteer or work experience per week are expected depending on the credit hour requirements. Prerequisites: BSC 1949  and permission of the instructor or program manager.

    This work-study course is designed to continue training in a student’s academic major through field experiences. The student, instructor and work-site supervisor work together to determine specific learning objectives for each student. The student is then evaluated based on documentation for satisfactory completion of the learning objectives and technical project. Cooperative education courses document supervised work experience within the student’s major. These hours are not transferable as upper level internships, practicums or clinical practice. The credit will count toward electives in some A.A. degrees. Contact the departments or universities for specific credit information. With program manager’s approval and based upon degree requirements, degree-seeking students who are making progress in their degree program may repeat this course for a maximum total of three credits.


    Click here for course scheduling information.



Business Law

  
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    BUL 2131 - Legal Environments of Business


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course introduces the legal environment of businesses and organizations. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Topics include the nature of law and legal process, law of contracts and torts, the United States Constitution, statutory and common law, business organizations and securities, antitrust, consumer protection and employment law.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BUL 3322 - Legal Issues in International Business


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (B.A.S.)


    This course gives the international business student an overview of the legal concepts affecting individuals and/or organizations that are involved in international business. Specifically, the student learns about the treaties giving rise to international law, differing legal regimes, international dispute resolution processes including principles of jurisdiction, differing governmental structures as they relate to commerce, global information systems regulations and international social issues affecting businesses and their operations.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    BUL 4333 - Contract Negotiation and Administration


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (B.A.S.)


    This course will expose students to the differences in the public and private sector contracting environments. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals of contract formation including sealed bidding, negotiations, and best value methods. Students will learn the fundamentals of contract administration including inspection and acceptance, quality control, contract changes, and disputes.


    Click here for course scheduling information.



Computer Applications

  
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    CAP 2140 - Data Forensics


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites:  .

    Students master the skills necessary to launch and complete a successful computer investigation. Students learn how to conduct high-tech investigations by acquiring digital evidence, set up a forensics lab, acquire the proper and necessary tools, and conduct the investigation and subsequent digital analysis.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    CAP 2141 - Data Forensics II


    (3 Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    Prerequisites:  .

    Students master the skills necessary to perform data forensics by doing hands-on activities with popular forensics software. These hands-on projects introduce the students to software such as Encase, ProDiscover, BackTrack 3, HexWorkshop, Knoppix-STD and others.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


  
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    CAP 2930 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    (1 to 3 variable Credit Hours)
    (A.S.)


    This course is designed to meet specific needs of individuals or groups for which regular, described courses may not be available. It may involve advanced programming projects, research, group projects or other experiences.


    Click here for course scheduling information.


 

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